Posts

Axis CNC Inc. – Featured Customer

Axis CNC Inc was founded in 2012 in Ware, Massachusetts, when Dan and Glenn Larzus, a father and son duo, decided to venture into the manufacturing industry. Axis CNC Inc has provided customers with the highest quality manufacturing, machining, and programming services since they’ve opened. They specialize in manufacturing medical equipment and have a passion for making snowmobile parts.

We sat down with Axis CNC Inc to discuss how they got started and what they have learned over there years in the manufacturing world. Watch our video below to see our full interview.

John Force Racing – Featured Customer

John Force Racing has been dominating the motorsports world for over 30 years, winning 20 championships and hundreds of races in the National Hot Rod Association (NHRA) drag racing series. John Force Racing features both Funny Car and Top Fuel teams, and just recently in 2017 they won both the Funny Car and Top Fuel championships in the same season.

John Force Racing invested in Force American Made to develop and create parts and components that would help drive all the teams to success and safety. The 84,000 square foot shop is located in Brownsburg, Indiana (just outside of Indianapolis) and is the heartbeat of John Force Racing. Thousands of parts are forged by Force American Made and its team of employees every season giving the team a competitive edge that has led to the team’s on-track success.

The Force American Made team has relied on Helical Solutions tooling to get the best performance and quality out of their CNC mills for years. The Harvey Performance Company team was invited out to Indiana to take a tour of Force American Made and spend some time with Tom Warga, Lead Machinist, to talk with him about his experiences with Helical Solutions tooling, his first time trying Machining Advisor Pro, the success they have had using the new Helical tool libraries for Mastercam, and the value their distributor, Dolen Tool, brings to the shop. Check out the video interview below to see the inner-workings of Force American Made and how Helical Solutions tooling has contributed to the success of this motorsports dynasty.

Slaying Stainless Steel: Machining Guide

Stainless steel can be as common as Aluminum in many shops, especially when manufacturing parts for the aerospace and automotive industries. It is a fairly versatile material with many different alloys and grades which can accommodate a wide variety of applications. However, it is also one of the most difficult to machine. Stainless steels are notorious end mill assassins, so dialing in your speeds and feeds and selecting the proper tool is essential for machining success.

Material Properties

Stainless steels are high-alloy steels with superior corrosion resistance to carbon and low-alloy steels. This is largely due to their high chromium content, with most grades of stainless steel alloys containing at least 10% of the element.

Stainless steel can be broken out into one of five categories: Austenitic, Ferritic, Martensitic, Precipitation Hardened (PH), and Duplex. In each category, there is one basic, general purpose alloy. From there, small changes in composition are made to the base in order to create specific properties for various applications.

For reference, here are the properties of each of these groupings, as well as a few examples of the popular grades and their common uses.

Category Properties Popular Grades Common Uses
Austenitic Non-magnetic, outstanding corrosion and heat resistance. 304, 316 Food processing equipment, gutters, bolts, nuts, and other fasteners.
Ferritic Magnetic, lower corrosion and heat resistance than Austenitic. 430, 446 Automotive parts and kitchen appliances.
Martensitic Magnetic, moderate corrosion resistance – not for severe corrosion. 416, 420, 440 Knives, firearms, surgical instruments, and hand tools.
Precipitation Hardened (PH) Strongest grade, heat treatable, severe corrosion resistance. 17-4 PH, 15-5 PH Aerospace components.
Duplex Stronger mixture of both Austenitic and Ferritic. 244, 2304, 2507 Water treatment plants, pressure vessels.

Tool Selection

Choosing the correct tooling for your application is crucial when machining stainless steel. Roughing, finishing, slotting, and high efficiency milling toolpaths can all be optimized for stainless steel by choosing the correct style of end mill.

Traditional Roughing

For traditional roughing, a 4 or 5 flute end mill is recommended. 5 flute end mills will allow for higher feed rates than their 4 flute counterparts, but either style would work well for roughing applications. Below is an excellent example of traditional roughing in 17-4 Stainless Steel.

 

 

Slotting

For slotting in stainless steel, chip evacuation is going to be key. For this reason, 4 flute tools are the best choice because the lower flute count allows for more efficient chip evacuation. Tools with chipbreaker geometry also make for effective slotting in stainless steel, as the smaller chips are easier to evacuate from the cut.

stainless steel machining

Finishing

When finishing stainless steel parts, a high flute count and/or high helix is required for the best results. Finishing end mills for stainless steel will have a helix angle over 40 degrees, and a flute count of 5 or more. For more aggressive finishing toolpaths, flute count can range from 7 flutes to as high as 14. Below is a great example of a finishing run in 17-4 Stainless Steel.

 

High Efficiency Milling

High Efficiency Milling can be a very effective machining technique in stainless steels if the correct tools are selected. Chipbreaker roughers would make an excellent choice, in either 5 or 7 flute styles, while standard 5-7 flute, variable pitch end mills can also perform well in HEM toolpaths.

stainless steel

HEV-5

Helical Solutions offers the HEV-5 end mill, which is an extremely versatile tool for a variety of applications. The HEV-5 excels in finishing and HEM toolpaths, and also performs well above average in slotting and traditional roughing. Available in square, corner radius, and long reach styles, this well-rounded tool is an excellent choice to kickstart your tool crib and optimize it for stainless steel machining.

stainless steel machining

Running Parameters

While tool selection is a critical step to more effective machining, dialing in the proper running parameters is equally important. There are many factors that go into determining the running parameters for stainless steel machining, but there are some general guidelines to follow as a starting point.

Generally speaking, when machining stainless steels a SFM of between 100-350 is recommended, with a chip load ranging between .0005” for a 1/8” end mill up to .006” for a 1” end mill. A full breakdown of these general guidelines is available here.

Machining Advisor Pro

Machining Advisor Pro is a cutting edge resource designed to precisely calculate running parameters for high performance Helical Solutions end mills in materials like stainless steel, aluminum, and much more. Simply input your tool, your exact material grade, and machine setup and Machining Advisor Pro will generate fully customizable running parameters. This free resource allows you to push your tools harder, faster, and smarter to truly dominate the competition.

In Conclusion

Stainless steel machining doesn’t have to be hard. By identifying the proper material grade for each part, selecting the perfect cutting tool, and optimizing running parameters, stainless steel machining headaches can be a thing of the past.

How to Avoid Composite Delamination with Compression Cutters

Composites are a group of materials made up of at least two unique constituents that, when combined, produce mechanical and physical properties favorable for a wide array of applications. These materials usually contain a binding ingredient, known as a matrix, filled with particles or fibers called reinforcements. Composites have become increasingly popular in the Aerospace, Automotive, and Sporting Goods industries because they can combine the strength of metal, the light weight of plastic, and the rigidity of ceramics.

Unfortunately, composite materials present some unique challenges to machinists. Many composites are very abrasive and can severely reduce tool life, while others can melt and burn if heat generation is not properly controlled. Even if these potential problems are avoided, the wrong tool can leave the part with other quality issues, including delamination.

While composites such as G10 and FR4 are considered “fibrous”, composites can also be “layered,” such as laminated sheets of PEEK and aluminum. Layered composites are vulnerable to delamination, when the layers of the material are separated by a tool’s cutting forces. This yields less structurally sound parts, defeating the purpose of the combined material properties in the first place. In many cases, a single delaminated hole can result in a scrapped part.

Using Compression Cutters in Composite Materials

Composite materials are generally machined with standard metal cutting end mills, which generate exclusively up or down cutting forces, depending on if they have right or left hand flute geometry. These uni-directional forces cause delamination (Figure 1).

delamination

Conversely, compression cutters are designed with both up and down-cut flutes. The top portion of the length of cut, closest to the shank, has a left hand spiral, forcing chips down. The bottom portion of the length of cut, closest to the end, has a right hand spiral, forcing chips up. When cutting, the opposing flute directions generate counteracting up-cut and down-cut forces. The opposing cutting forces stabilize the material removal, which compresses the composite layers, combatting delamination on the top and bottom of a workpiece (Figure 2).

compression cutters

Since compression cutters do not pull up or press down on a workpiece, they leave an excellent finish on layered composites and lightweight materials like plywood. It is important to note, however, that compression cutters are suited specifically to profiling, as the benefits of the up and down-cut geometry are not utilized in slotting or plunging operations.

Something as simple as choosing a tool suited to a specific composite material can have significant effects on the quality of the final part. Consider utilizing tools optimized for different composites and operations or learn how to select the right drill for composite holemaking.

Magnuson Superchargers – Featured Customer

Magnuson Superchargers is a manufacturer of aftermarket and OEM (Original Equipment Manufacturer) supercharger systems for the automotive industry, located in Ventura, California. Started by industry legend Jerry Magnuson, Magnuson Superchargers has quickly grown into one of the most respected brands in the automotive industry. Magnuson creates products for various brands, including GM, Mopar, Ford, AUDI, Mercedes-Benz, Lexus, Toyota, and Jeep. Magnuson Superchargers are most commonly found in “hot rods,” everyday vehicles, off-road vehicles, and vehicles purpose built for competitive racing, as they are used to significantly yet reliably increase horsepower.

The Magnuson Superchargers team of technicians combine modern and time-tested prototyping and fabrication techniques to construct each component to exact specifications and the highest quality. Magnuson has a complete machine shop in house for fabrication of new prototype system components. This allows them to operate efficiently with short runs and high volume production.

magnuson superchargers

Hubert Gromek, Magnuson Superchargers’ Machine Shop Manager, is a 15-year veteran of the industry. We spoke with Hubert about his experiences building a career in the manufacturing industry, his advice for young machinists, and the way he and his team use both Harvey Tool and Helical Solutions tools in their machine shop every day.


Tell us a little bit about yourself.

I started with Magnuson Superchargers 15-plus years ago as a young kid who didn’t know anything about machining at all. Being a major car guy and drag racer, working for a company that makes superchargers was a perfect fit for me.  I started by deburring and washing parts and worked my way up to operating our Fadal Vertical Mills.

From there I started to get the concept of what it actually takes to machine things and started learning how to do all the setups; I even started making my own fixtures here and there. After a couple of years of being the setup guy for our shop, I started looking into the programming aspect of the job and that really grabbed my interest right away. It’s one thing to run and set up machines with other people’s programs and instruction, but it’s a whole new world when you have to do the entire job from scratch on your own.

magnuson superchargers

After a couple of years of being the Lead Setup Programmer here at our shop, I was given the opportunity to be the Machine Shop Manager. I was very honored that the owner of such a big and great company thought I had what it takes to run the whole shop. Let me tell you, when you are responsible for everything that goes on in a machine shop, it really opens your eyes to how much every little thing matters. The one thing I learned very quickly is how important it is to have the right team in your shop to support you and reach the goals that are set. It doesn’t matter how great a manager or programmer you are, if you don’t have the right team of machinists in your shop, you are setting yourself up for failure. After many years of trying, I think I have finally found that team that I’ve been looking for.

What made you get into machining?

It was when I first saw a raw piece of material (billet aluminum) become a billet bracket for a hot rod my boss was working on. I thought that was the coolest thing ever. You start with nothing and the finished product was a work of art to me. I knew right then that I wanted to do that someday.

What is your greatest challenge as a machinist?

This is a two-part answer. First, it is finding the right core team that you can trust and not have to worry about what they are doing. My current team is comprised of experienced and disciplined machinists and they know what needs to get done. I don’t have to watch over them, I just try to guide them and teach them everything that I have learned over the years.

The second part has always been fixture design. I am always learning how to make better, more user-friendly fixtures to help speed up production but still maintain very high part quality.

magnuson superchargers

What is your favorite part of this profession?

I really love the fact that I learn something new every day. It doesn’t matter how much you think you know, there is always a job that will test your ability as a machinist.

What made you decide to use Harvey Tool and Helical products?

Actually I have a great local tool supplier that I deal with all the time. His name is Mike Baldino over at PM Industrial, and he is the one who first introduced me to both of these products. We make tiny Dovetail O-Ring grooves in a lot of our parts and I couldn’t find a tool that would do the job like I wanted it to. Mike recommended the Harvey Tool .135″ Dovetail Cutter and I haven’t used anything else since. As for the Helical End Mills, since 98% of our jobs are in aluminum, Mike also recommended I try these new (at the time) Zplus coated Helical End Mills. Just like the Harvey Tool Dovetail Cutter, I haven’t used anything else since I found out how amazing these cutters worked for us.

magnuson superchargers

Why is high quality tool performance important to your team at Magnuson Superchargers?

We work with a lot of castings here at Magnuson Superchargers, and even though they are aluminum, they can be very abrasive. Because of this, tool life and part finishes are very important to us. The Helical End Mills hold up very well to cast and billet materials and the Harvey Tool Dovetail Cutters are the only thing that works for us.

Tell us about your favorite projects that Harvey Tool or Helical Solutions tools helped you create.

We make most of our casting tooling in-house, which includes master patterns and core boxes, usually in 6061 Billet Aluminum. The Helical Zplus coated End Mills are amazing for doing these jobs. Using the dynamic toolpaths and utilizing the entire flute length is great. As for the Harvey Tool Dovetail Cutters, I haven’t used anything that works better than these. Every project has become easier with the use of both Harvey Tool and Helical Solutions tools.

magnuson superchargers

A 2016 Chevrolet Camaro loaded with the TVS2300 supercharger at the track.

One of our most exciting projects is our new TVS2300 supercharger that we built for our 2016 Chevrolet Camaro. We took a completely stock engine and transmission, and with just our supercharger and a couple of modifications it was able to run a 9 second 1/4 mile drag race. This was very impressive and has made a huge impact in the automotive industry. We are very excited about this kit and the potential it has in the market.

We have also been working on the biggest supercharger that our company has ever made, the new TVS2650. We are very proud of the all the R&D work that has gone into this kit and we are seeing some incredible horsepower numbers from these units. We displayed this at last year’s Specialty Equipment Market Association (SEMA) show in Las Vegas. We are still in the prototype stages of this project but will have production units coming very soon.

magnuson superchargers

A prototype of the new TVS2650 supercharger, the largest ever built by Magnuson.

Would you recommend that young people take the #PlungeIntoMachining and start a career as a machinist?

I personally would recommend a career in machining to anyone who has an interest in how things are made. I believe it is a great career choice. There are always going to be parts that have to get made somehow, so there is no shortage of open jobs available in the industry. I have a 4 year old son and as soon as he is old enough, I will teach him everything I know about this profession. If he chooses not to go that route, that is completely okay, but at least he will know what it takes to make something from scratch.

If you could give one piece of advice to a new machinist, what would it be?

Learn the basics. Start with a manual mill or lathe and get some experience with how it feels to cut something. Lots of people start on a CNC as an operator and call themselves “machinists.” It took me 5 years before my boss officially called me a machinist! Trust me, it feels really good when your boss hands you a print or CAD model and says “make this,” and you come back with a perfect part that you were able to make yourself.

magnuson superchargers

The Magnuson Superchargers machine shop team. From left: John, Jesus, Jun, Miguel, Jesse, Kenton, and Armando.

Would you like to be considered for a future “Featured Customer” blog? Click here to submit your information.

Photos courtesy of Magnuson Superchargers