Posts

Reducing Tool Runout

Tool runout is a given in any machine shop, and can never be 100% avoided. Thus, it is important to establish an acceptable level of runout for any project, and stay within that range to optimize productivity and prolong tool life. Smaller runout levels are always better, but choice of machine and tool holder, stick-out, tool reach, and many other factors all have an influence on the amount of runout in every setup.

Defining Tool Runout

Tool runout is the measurement of how far a cutting tool, holder, or spindle rotates off of its true axis. This can be seen in low quality end mills where the cutting diameter is true to size when measured while stationary, but measures above tolerance while rotating.

The first step to minimizing runout is understanding what individual factors cause runout in every machine setup. Runout is seen in the accuracy of every cutting tool, collet, tool holder, and spindle. Every added connection between a machine and the workpiece it is cutting will introduce a higher level of runout. Each increase can add to the total runout further and further. Steps should be taken with every piece of tooling and equipment to minimize runout for best performance, increased tool life, and quality finished products.

Measuring Runout

Determining the runout of your system is the first step towards finding how to combat it. Runout is measured using an indicator that measures the variation of a tool’s diameter as it rotates. This is done with either a dial/probe indicator or a laser measuring device. While most dial indicators are both portable and easy to use, they are not as accurate as the available laser indicators, and can also make a runout measurement worse by pushing on a tool. This is mostly a concern for miniature and micro-tooling, where lasers should be strictly used due to the tool’s fragile nature.  Most end mill manufacturers recommend using a laser runout indicator in place of a dial indicator wherever possible.

Z-Mike Laser

Z-Mike laser measurement devices are common instruments used to measure levels of tool runout.

Runout should be measured at the point where a tool will be cutting, typically at the end of the tools, or along a portion of the length of cut. A dial indicator may not be plausible in these instances due to the inconsistent shape of a tool’s flutes. Laser measuring devices offer another advantage due to this fact.

High Quality Tools

The amount of runout in each component of a system, as-manufactured, often has a significant impact on the total runout of a given setup. Cutting tools all have a restriction on maximum runout allowed when manufactured, and some can have allowances of .0002” or less. This is often the value that should be strived for in a complete system as well. For miniature tooling down to .001” diameter, this measurement will have to be held to an even smaller value. As the ratio of tool runout to tool diameter becomes larger, threats of tool failure increase. As stated earlier, starting with a tool that has minimal runout is pivotal in keeping the total runout of a system to a minimum. This is runout that cannot be avoided.

Precision Tool Holders

The next step to minimizing runout is ensuring that you are using a high quality, precision tool holder. These often come in the form of shrink-fit, or press-fit tool holders offering accurate and precise tool rotation.  Uniform pressure around the entire circumference of a shank is essential for reducing runout. Set screw based holders should be avoided, as they push the tool off-center with their uneven holding pressure.  Collet-based tool holders also often introduce an extra amount of runout due to their additional components. Each added connection in a tool holding system allows more methods of runout to appear. Shrink-fit and press-fit tool holders are inherently better at minimizing runout due to their fewer components.

tool runout

Included in your tool holding considerations should be machine tool cleanliness. Often, chips can become lodged in the spindle, and cause an obstruction between two high-precision surfaces in the system. Ensuring that your tool holder and spindle are clean and free of chips and debris is paramount when setting up for every job.

Shank Modifications

Apart from equipment itself, many other factors can contribute to an increasing amount of tool runout. These can include how long a tool is, how rigid a machine setup is, and how far a tool is hanging out of its holder.  Shank modifications, along with their methods of tool holding can have a large impact. Often thought of as an older, obsolete technology, Weldon flats are found guilty of adding large amounts of runout in many shops. While many shops still use Weldon flats to ensure a secure grip on their tools, having a set screw pushing a tool to one side can push it off center, yielding very high levels of runout. Haimer Safe Lock™ is another option increasing in popularity that is a much higher performance holding technology. The Safe-Lock™ system is designed with the same tolerances as shrink fit and other high precision tool holders. It is able to minimize runout, while firmly holding a tool in place with no chance of pull-out.

haimer safe lock

The Haimer Safe-Lock™ system is one option to greatly reduce tool runout.

Runout will never be completely eliminated from a machining system. However, steps can (and should) be taken to keep it to a minimum using every method possible. Keeping a tool running true will extend tool life, increase performance, and ultimately save your shop time and money. Runout is a common concern in the metalworking industry, but it is often overlooked when it could be main issue causing part rejections and unacceptable results. Every piece of a machine tool plays a part in the resultant runout, and none should be overlooked.

Most Common Methods of Tool Entry

Tool entry is pivotal to machining success, as it’s one of the most punishing operations for a cutter. Entering a part in a way that’s not ideal for the tool or operation could lead to a damaged part or exhausted shop resources. Below, we’ll explore the most common part entry methods, as well as tips for how to perform them successfully.


Pre-Drilled Hole

Pre-drilling a hole to full pocket depth (and 5-10% larger than the end mill diameter) is the safest practice of dropping your end mill into a pocket. This method ensures the least amount of end work abuse and premature tool wear.

tool entry predrill

 


Helical Interpolation

Helical Interpolation is a very common and safe practice of tool entry with ferrous materials. Employing corner radius end mills during this operation will decrease tool wear and lessen corner breakdown. With this method, use a programmed helix diameter of greater than 110-120% of the cutter diameter.

helical interpolation

 


Ramping-In

This type of operation can be very successful, but institutes many different torsional forces the cutter must withstand. A strong core is key for this method, as is room for proper chip evacuation. Using tools with a corner radius, which strengthen its cutting portion, will help.

ramping

Suggested Starting Ramp Angles:

Hard/Ferrous Materials: 1°-3°

Soft/Non-Ferrous Materials: 3°-10°

For more information on this popular tool entry method, see Ramping to Success.


Arcing

This method of tool entry is similar to ramping in both method and benefit. However, while ramping enters the part from the top, arcing does so from the side. The end mill follows a curved tool path, or arc, when milling, this gradually increasing the load on the tool as it enters the part. Additionally, the load put on the tool decreases as it exits the part, helping to avoid shock loading and tool breakage.


Straight Plunge

This is a common, yet often problematic method of entering a part. A straight plunge into a part can easily lead to tool breakage. If opting for this machining method, however, certain criteria must be met for best chances of machining success. The tool must be center cutting, as end milling incorporates a flat entry point making chip evacuation extremely difficult. Drill bits are intended for straight plunging, however, and should be used for this type of operation.

tool entry

 


Straight Tool Entry

Straight entry into the part takes a toll on the cutter, as does a straight plunge. Until the cutter is fully engaged, the feed rate upon entry is recommended to be reduced by at least 50% during this operation.

tool entry

 


Roll-In Tool Entry

Rolling into the cut ensures a cutter to work its way to full engagement and naturally acquire proper chip thickness. The feed rate in this scenario should be reduced by 50%.

tool entry

 

How To Avoid 4 Major Types of Tool Wear

The following is just one of several blog posts relevant to High Efficiency Milling. To achieve a full understanding of this popular machining method, view any of the additional HEM posts below!

Introduction to High Efficiency Milling I High Speed Machining vs. HEM I How to Combat Chip Thinning I Diving into Depth of Cut I Intro to Trochoidal Milling


Defining Tool Wear

Tool wear is the breakdown and gradual failure of a cutting tool due to regular operation. Every tool will experience tool wear at some point in its life. Excessive wear will show inconsistencies and have unwanted effects on your workpiece, so it is important to avoid tool wear in order to achieve optimal end mill performance. Tool wear can also lead to failure, which in turn can lead to serious damage, rework, and scrapped parts.

tool wear

An example of a tool with no wear

tool wear

An example of a tool with excessive wear

To prolong tool life, identifying and mitigating the various signs of tool wear is key. Both thermal and mechanical stresses cause tool wear, with heat and abrasion being the major culprits. Learning how to identify the most common types of tool wear and what causes them can help machinists remedy issues quickly and extend tool longevity.


Abrasive Wear

The wear land is a pattern of uniform abrasion on the cutting edge of the tool, caused by mechanical abrasion from the workpiece. This dulls the cutting edge of a tool, and can even alter dimensions such as the tool diameter. At higher speeds, excessive heat becomes more of an issue, causing more damage to the cutting edge, especially when an appropriate tool coating is not used.

tool wear

If the wear land becomes excessive or causes premature tool failure, reducing the cutting speed and optimizing coolant usage can help. High Efficiency Milling (HEM) toolpaths can help reduce wear by spreading the work done by the tool over its entire length of cut. This prevents localized wear and will prolong tool life by using the entire cutting edge available.


Chipping

Chipping can be easily identified by a nicked or flaked edge on the cutting tool, or by examining the surface finish of a part. A poor surface finish can often indicate that a tool has experienced some sort of chipping, which can lead to eventual catastrophic tool failure if it is not caught.

tool wear

Chipping is typically caused by excessive loads and shock-loading during operation, but it can also be caused by thermal cracking, another type of tool wear which is explored in further detail below. To counter chipping, ensure the milling operation is completely free of vibration and chatter. Taking a look at the speeds and feeds can also help. Interrupted cuts and repeated part entry can also have a negative impact on a tool. Reducing feed rates for these situations can mitigate the risk of chipping.


Thermal Cracking

Thermal cracking is often identified by cracks in the tool perpendicular to the cutting edge. Cracks form slowly, but they can lead to both chipping and premature tool failure.

tool wear

Thermal cracking, as its name suggests, is caused by extreme temperature fluctuations during milling. Adding a proper coating to an end mill is beneficial in providing heat resistance and reduced abrasion on a tool. HEM toolpaths provide excellent protection against thermal cracking, as these toolpaths spread the heat across the cutting edge of the tool, reducing the overall temperature and preventing serious fluctuations in heat.


Fracture

Fracture is the complete loss of tool usage due to sudden breakage, often as a result of improper speeds and feeds, an incorrect coating, or an inappropriate depth of cut. Tool holder issues or loose work holding can also cause a fracture, as can inconsistencies in workpiece material properties.

tool wear

Photo courtesy of @cubanana___ on Instagram

Adjusting the speeds, feeds, and depth of cut and checking the setup for rigidity will help to reduce fracturing. Optimizing coolant usage can also be helpful to avoid hot spots in materials which can dull a cutting edge and cause a fracture. HEM toolpaths prevent fracture by offering a more consistent load on a tool. Shock loading is reduced, causing less stress on a tool, which lessens the likelihood of breakage and increases tool life.


It is important to monitor tools and keep them in good, working condition to avoid downtime and save money. Wear is caused by both thermal and mechanical forces, which can be mitigated by running with appropriate running parameters and HEM toolpaths to spread wear over the entire length of cut. While every tool will eventually experience some sort of tool wear, the effects can be delayed by paying close attention to speeds and feeds and depth of cut. Preemptive action should be taken to correct issues before they cause complete tool failure.  

Diving Into Depth of Cut: Peripheral, Slotting, & HEM Approaches

The following is just one of several blog posts relevant to High Efficiency Milling. To achieve a full understanding of this popular machining method, view any of the additional HEM posts below!

Introduction to High Efficiency Milling I High Speed Machining vs. HEM I How to Combat Chip Thinning I How to Avoid 4 Major Types of Tool Wear I Intro to Trochoidal Milling


Every machining operation entails a radial and axial depth of cut strategy. Radial depth of cut (RDOC), the distance a tool is stepping over into a workpiece; and Axial depth of cut (ADOC), the distance a tool engages a workpiece along its centerline, are the backbones of machining. Machining to appropriate depths – whether slotting or peripheral milling (profiling, roughing, and finishing), is vital to your machining success (Figure 1).

Below, you will be introduced to the traditional methods for both peripheral milling and slotting. Additionally, High Efficiency Milling (HEM) strategies – and appropriate cutting depths for this method – will be explained.

Quick Definitions:

Radial Depth of Cut (RDOC): The distance a tool is stepping over into a workpiece. Also referred to as Stepover, Cut Width, or XY.

Axial Depth of Cut (ADOC): The distance a tool engages a workpiece along its centerline. Also referred to as Stepdown, or Cut Depth.

Peripheral Milling: An application in which only a percentage of the tool’s cutter diameter is engaging a part.

Slotting: An application in which the tool’s entire cutter diameter is engaging a part.

High Efficiency Milling (HEM): A newer machining strategy in which a light RDOC and heavy ADOC is paired with increased feed rates to achieve higher material removal rates and decreased tool wear.

depth of cut


Peripheral Milling Styles and Appropriate RDOC

The amount a tool engages a workpiece radially during peripheral milling is dependent upon the operation being performed (Figure 2). In finishing applications, smaller amounts of material are removed from a wall, equating to about 3-5% of the cutter diameter per radial pass. In heavy roughing applications, 30-50% of the tool’s cutter diameter is engaged with the part. Although heavy roughing involves a higher RDOC than finishing, the ADOC is most often smaller than for finishing due to load on the tool.

roughing depth of cut


Slotting Styles and Appropriate ADOC Engagement

The amount a tool engages a part axially during a slotting operation must be appropriate for the tool being used (Figure 3). Using an inappropriate approach could lead to tool deflection and damage, and poor part quality.

End mills come in various length of cut options, as well as numerous reached options. Choosing the tool that allows the completion of a project with the least deflection, and highest productivity, is critical. As the ADOC needed to slot can be lower, a stub length of cut is often the strongest and most appropriate tool choice. As slot depths increase, longer lengths of cut become necessary, but reached tooling should be used where allowable.

slotting depth of cut


Depth of Cut Strategy for High Efficiency Milling (HEM)

Pairing a light RDOC and heavy ADOC with high performance toolpaths is a machining strategy known as High Efficiency Milling or HEM. With this machining style, feed rates can be increased and cuts are kept uniform to evenly distribute stresses across the cutting portion of the tool, prolonging tool life.

Traditional Strategy

  • Heavy RDOC
  • Light ADOC
  • Conservative Feed Rate

Newer Strategy – High Efficiency Milling (HEM)

  • Light RDOC
  • Heavy ADOC
  • Increased Feed Rate

HEM involves using 7-30% of the tool diameter radially and up to twice the cutter diameter axially, paired with increased feed rates (Figure 4).  Accounting for chip thinning, this combination of running parameters can result in noticeably higher metal removal rates (MRR). Modern CAM software often offers a complete high performance solution with built-in features for HEM toolpaths.  These principals can also be applied to trochoidal toolpaths for slotting applications.

depth of cut