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3 Steps to Shutting Up Tool Chatter

Cutting tools undergo a great deal of force during the machining process, which cause vibrations – also known as chatter or harmonics. Avoiding these vibrations entirely is not possible, though minimizing them is pivotal for machining success. Vibrations become damaging when proper machining steps are not followed. This leads to strong, part-ruining chatter. In these situations, parts have what is known as “chatter marks,” or clear vibration marks along the surface of a part. Tools can experience an increased rate of wear due to excess vibration.

Tool Chatter can be kept at bay by following three simple, yet often overlooked steps:

1. Select the Right Tool for Your Job

It seems elementary, but selecting the best tool for your application can be confusing. With so many different geometric styles for tooling – overall length, length of cut, reach, number of flutes – it can sometimes be difficult to narrow down one specific tool for your job. Oftentimes, machinists opt for general purpose tooling that can perform a variety of operations, overlooking the option that’s optimized for one material and job.

Opting for Material Specific Tooling is helpful, as each material has different needs. For example, steels are machined differently than aluminum materials. Everything from the chip size, to chip evacuation, is different. Variable Helix or Variable Pitch designs help to minimize chatter by reducing harmonics, which are caused by the cutting edge having repeated contact with the workpiece. In order to reduce harmonics, the time intervals between flute contact with the workpiece are varied.

Overall length is another important factor to consider when deciding on a tool for your job. The more overhang, or length the tool hangs from the spindle, the less secure the spindle-to-tool connection is, and the more vibration. Ensuring that your tool is only as long as needed for your operation is important to minimizing chatter and harmonics. If machining deep within a part, opt for reached tooling or an extended reach tool holder to help solidify the connection.

2. Ensure a Secure Connection

When it comes to secure tool holding approaches, both the tool shank and the collet are important. A loose tool, unsurprisingly, has more ability to move, or vibrate, during machining. With this in mind, Helical offers Shank Configurations to help the connection including the ToughGRIP Shank, which replaces a smooth, mirror-like surface with a rougher, coarser one for increased friction. Helical is also a licensee of the HAIMER Safe-Lock™, added grooves on the shank of a tool that work opposite of the spindle rotation, securely fastening the tool in place.

Machinists must also know the different types of collets available to them to identify if a better solution might be necessary. For example, Hydraulic Tool Holders or Shrink Fit Tool Holders promote a stronger connection than a Mechanical Spindle Tightening method.

For more information, see Key Tool Holding Considerations

3. Choose a Chatter Minimizing Strategy

How a tool is run can mean the difference between stellar job results and a ruined part. This includes both the parameters a tool is run at, as well as the direction by which it rotates – either a Conventional Milling or a Climb Milling technique.

Conventional Milling

In this method, the chip width starts from zero and increases gradually, causing more heat to diffuse into the workpiece. This can lead to work hardening, creating more headaches for a machinist.

tool chatter

Climb Milling

Most modern machine shops will use a climb milling technique, or when the chip width starts at its maximum and decreases during the cut. Climb Milling will offer a more consistent cut than traditional methods, and puts less stress on the tool. Think of it like weight lifting – doing the heavy lifting will be easiest at the beginning of your workout. Similarly, a cut in which the thickest chip is removed first helps the tool maintain its strength. Because the chip cutting process is more swift, vibrations are minimized.

decrease tool chatter

For more information, see Climb Milling Vs. Conventional Milling

In Conclusion

Vibrations are unavoidable during the machining process, but minimizing them can mean the difference between successful machining and scrapped parts. Following three simple rules can help to keep your chatter and harmonics under control, including: Selecting the right tool, ensuring a secure machine-tool connection, and using it in a climb milling strategy. Both Harvey Tool and Helical Solutions have tools that can help, including shank modifications and Variable Helix or Variable Pitch end mills.

Anderson Prototypes – Featured Customer

Anderson Prototypes is a custom machine shop in Port Moody, British Columbia. Working with everything from Titanium to Bamboo, they create mechanical mechanisms and working prototypes of new technology. By applying 25 years of experience with manual and CNC machinery, they craft amazing parts, some even bordering on impossible. The team at Anderson Prototypes works in a variety of industries, ranging from large-scale prototype work to small batch production, machine repair, and even movie and TV props.

Jim Anderson, a 30 year veteran of the manufacturing industry, is the Founder and Owner of Anderson Prototypes. We caught up with Jim and talked to him about some of the “impossible” projects his team likes to take, his experiences in the film industry, and his advice for the aspiring machinist.

Tell us a bit about your shop, how you got started, and what sort of products you manufacture.

I started in machining in 1985, as a full-time student in a machining class at a local community college. I spent years working in jobbing shops, plastic mold injection shops, and specialized start-up companies, scratch building a range of things from high-speed water “pouch” filling machines to hydrogen fuel-cells. Today I work with a wide range of clients including 3 submarine companies, a military contractor, companies that use custom built or modified ROVs and drones, food packaging companies, production companies needing film and TV props, and more.

What made you get into machining?

I have always been an actively creative person, and I enjoyed wood and machine shop in high school. I found a creative outlet for my talents to build and fix things inside the machine shop environment. I continue to study machines and items, to understand how they were made, and how it could be made better or simplified.

anderson prototypes

What is your favorite part of this profession?

I always enjoy creating something for a client that they have been dreaming of, sometimes for years. They come to me with a sketch on a napkin or a verbal idea, and I turn that dream into reality. When they come to pick it up and see it for the first time, the emotions are tremendous!

What sort of machines do you use in your shop?

I have 2 Tormach 1100 CNC mills, one 4 axis and the other 3 axis, a Sherline 2000, 4 axis CNC mill, a Frankenstein CNC lathe with a 8 station tool changer for small work, a Milltronics ML-17 CNC lathe, a Colchester Student Engine Lathe, and a smaller manual milling machine. I also have drill presses, tapping heads and tons of specialized fixturing and work holding devices, as well as a 60 ton hydraulic press and the specialized equipment that comes with it.

micro machining

Which materials do you work with in your shop?

Just about everything. Lots of plastics, PEEK, Delrin and Acrylic, aluminum, steels, stainless steels, carbon fiber, different woods, laminates, and more.

What sets Anderson Prototypes apart from the competition?

We often take on jobs that other shops won’t, due to our team’s large vision. We stand behind every piece we make and have zero returned items to date. Embodying both old-school traditions and cutting-edge technology, Anderson Prototypes believes that “Impossible is just an Opinion”. We work with a project from the very beginning to the time it is up and running at the client’s facility. We work with building very small detailed machines to unique and weird items that someone dreamed up and could not find anyone able to make. We also love to give back to the community. We have sponsored local high school and university students in competitions, and we have played a part in the Maker Community since Day One. We also made and donated a doggy wheelchair to a dog in need (YouTube), and we sponsor a local softball league.

How did you get into the entertainment/prop business?

Vancouver has a huge movie industry, and there are many people in my network that work in the industry. The need for various props, new equipment, and repairs can go up and down as movies are being filmed. The first job I did (I think), was for a movie called Space Buddies, the 4th or 5th entry in the Air Bud movie series. I made the Doggles (dog goggles), that the dog is wearing on the DVD cover. Most movies require a Non-Disclosure Agreements before any work is done, so I can’t talk about much, but I have made my impact on the screen, behind the scenes, and even live on stage. I also did a major prop for an Australian TV show that was apparently popular down under, so you never know where this work will take you!

micro machined

Who is the most famous contact that you have worked on a project with?

I have met many directors and producers of large budget films and TV shows. Unfortunately, because of the Non-Disclosure Agreements, I cannot mention any names.

Why is high-quality tool performance important to you?

I buy all my tooling from North America. I am lucky enough to have a solid carbide tooling manufacturer 5 miles from my shop, so I get quality endmills, made to order. When I need something specialized, Harvey is the only company I go to. When a tool does more than I expect, I make more money and have less stress. I count on that and become a return customer. For example, I used a .018″ Miniature End Mill (#73018-C3) on some acrylic parts I was making. There were 40 parts in total, all around the size of a stamp, with lots of tiny details, high tolerances, and very small features. I had the machine running at 15,500 RPM for 3 weeks, and I only broke one tool in that entire run. What a great tool!

What is your favorite process to work on as a machinist?

I really enjoy making something I have never worked on before, that new challenge. Often it seems that I am designing new items now more than ever. I have to do things that are not being done commercially and I stand behind it. So I might run the manual lathe, the CNC mill and then the CNC lathe on one part. I enjoy the variety.

anderson prototypes

Why is manufacturing your products in North America important to you?

American and Canadian-made products are very important to me. I purchase North American-made products like steel and aluminum, and bearings and fasteners all of kinds. I also access services locally, such as laser cutting, anodizing and powder coating, to support these local businesses. I feel its very important to the customer making the purchase that these are products my neighbors are helping to build.

If you could give one piece of advice to a new machinist ready to take the #PlungeIntoMachining, what would it be?

Take the time to take an accredited machine shop training course, like I did. It will give you all the groundwork to understand the real world of machining. I know a few fellas with small CNCs that can’t make a living because they don’t understand the depth of set-ups or work holding, for example, because they never learned from an expert. They can’t make parts fast enough, they charge 1/2 of what I do, and it takes then 3 times as long, so they simply can’t compete with me. Just be aware that it doesn’t happen overnight; I was a Journeyman Machinist for over 30 years, and still ask for help from my mentors occasionally. Oh, and find yourself a quality machine. Find a good used HAAS, or OKK, or something made in the US, UK or Europe. Your clients will respect you more and it will work longer and more accurately.

Is there anything else you would like to share with the In The Loupe community?

I am grateful for the education I have received from the many journeyman machinists, engineers, mechanics, electricians, pilots, sea captains and more who I have worked beside in my years. I am happy to share and offer problem-solving, sometimes for free, other times at consultation rates. When a young eager person asks me a question, I do the best I can to answer it in a way that benefits them long term. Sometimes they don’t like the answer, but I tell them to come back in 6 months and tell me how it went. That’s when the rubber hits the road.

anderson prototypes


Would you like to be considered for a future “Featured Customer” blog? Click here to submit your information.

Photos courtesy of Anderson Prototypes.

Weiss Watches – Featured Customer

Weiss Watch Company is restoring prestige to American watchmaking. They design and build timepieces with mechanical movements by hand in Los Angeles, California. Each timepiece is individually assembled in America. Their practices merge historical techniques and modern technological advances, with every process perfected by a Swiss-trained and certified American watchmaker. Weiss Watch Company strives to increase the percentage of domestic sourcing with each edition, and is the only company resurrecting industry practices that have not been active in the United States for decades.

Grant Hughson is a Manufacturing Engineer at Weiss Watch Company. Grant “lives and breathes” manufacturing, currently working in his spare time as a Manufacturing Instructor at Saddleback College. We spoke to Grant for this latest featured customer blog about the watch-making process, his experiences in the industry, and his thoughts on the state of American manufacturing.

weiss watches

What made you get into machining?

I grew up with a love for finely machined products, like watches, guns, and fishing gear. I also loved car racing, and a lot of the modifications on the cars are machined from various materials. So, from a young age, I was obsessed with the work that went into these products, and knew I wanted to be a part of the manufacturing industry.

What is your favorite part of this profession?

I love the entire manufacturing process. It always starts with a dream, or an idea. Then you take that idea and turn it into a drawing, and soon after, you’ll be modeling it. The best part is when you go to actually machine the part, and watch your original idea turn into a tangible part or product.

watchmaking

What is the most challenging part of the watch-making process?

There are a few challenging parts of the watch-making process, starting with the super-tight tolerances. Surface finish is also extremely important, and can be difficult to nail. Many surface finishes in watchmaking are visual, so roughness can be deceiving. We also were forced to design all of our workholding from scratch, as nothing currently existed in the market that would work for our machining process.

You mentioned your tight tolerances. What tolerances do you typically work in?

My tolerances are in the tenths. The holes that hold the jewels (watch bearings) are +0.0002, -0.

weiss watches

What sort of machines do you have in your shop?

We have a 3 axis vertical milling machine and a 9 axis Swiss style lathe in the shop.

What type of materials do you work in?

We work in steel, stainless steel, aluminum, brass, and titanium every day. It is a wide variety, but it keeps things interesting!

How have Harvey Tool products impacted your overall shop performance?

Harvey Tools have been great tools for me. I do a lot of prototype work, and constantly need odd sized tools or specialty profiles to finish a job. Thankfully, the Harvey Tool selection is HUGE. Somehow you guys always have what I need!

Tell us about your favorite project that Harvey Tools helped to create.

I love what I do everyday, so my favorite project is an ongoing one; making watches!

watchmaking tools

Why is high quality tool performance important to you?

It’s a must! Tool to tool accuracy and performance is vital in this business, especially with our extremely tight tolerances. High quality tools make sure that we get the same performance time after time without needing to scrap parts. This saves us valuable time and money.

What is your favorite process to work on as a machinist?

I really enjoy fixture design. Holding small parts for fixture design is an art! If it’s too tight, they’re smashed. If it’s too loose, see you later; your part is gone!

As a manufacturing engineer, I also enjoy the programming aspect of CNC machining. Being able to program the toolpaths and turn my programming skills into tangible parts is why I got into this business.

weiss watches

If you were stranded on a desert island with only one Harvey Tool or Helical tool, which would it be, and why?

It would have to be the Harvey 1/4″  30° engraving tool. I could mount it to the end of a stick. It would make for a hell of a spear!

Why is manufacturing products in America important to you?

Manufacturing products in America is a crucial part of the success and security of our business. When someone else makes your parts, its not hard for them to make a competing product. Making everything on-site keeps our proprietary information safe.

If you could give one piece of advice to a new machinist ready to take the #PlungeIntoMachining, what would it be?

Ask a lot of questions and never stop learning. It’s not easy but it’s worth it. If you consider yourself a maker or inventor, it’s the only place to be! Manufacturing is awesome, and anyone who tells you different is on the way out. Keep up the good work, and keep manufacturing your products in America!

weiss watches

Would you like to be considered for a future “Featured Customer” blog? Click here to submit your information.

Photos courtesy of Weiss Watch Company.

Applying HEM to Micromachining

The following is just one of several blog posts relevant to High Efficiency Milling. To achieve a full understanding of this popular machining method, view any of the additional HEM posts below!

Introduction to High Efficiency Milling I High Speed Machining vs. HEM I How to Combat Chip Thinning I Diving into Depth of Cut I How to Avoid 4 Major Types of Tool Wear I Intro to Trochoidal Milling


Benefits of Using HEM with Miniature Tooling

High Efficiency Milling (HEM) is a technique for roughing that utilizes a lower Radial Depth of Cut (RDOC), and a higher Axial Depth of Cut (ADOC). This delays the rate of tool wear, reducing the chance of failure and prolonging tool life while boosting productivity and Material Removal Rates (MRR). Because this machining method boosts MRR, miniature tooling (<.125”) is commonly overlooked for HEM operations. Further, many shops also do not have the high RPM capabilities necessary to see the benefits of HEM for miniature tooling. However, if used properly, miniature tooling can produce the same benefits of HEM that larger diameter tooling can.

Benefits of HEM:

  • Extended tool life and performance.
  • Faster cycle times.
  • Overall cost savings

Preventing Common Challenges

Utilizing miniature tooling for HEM, while beneficial if performed correctly, presents challenges that all machinists must be mindful of. Knowing what to keep an eye out for is a pivotal first step to success.

Tool Fragility & Breakage

Breakage is one of the main challenges associated with utilizing HEM with miniature tooling due to the fragility of the tool. Spindle runout and vibration, tool deflection, material inconsistencies, and uneven loading are just some of the problems which can lead to a broken tool. To prevent this, more attention must be paid to the machine setup and material to ensure the tools have the highest chance of success.

As a general rule, HEM should not be considered when using tools with cutting diameters less than .031”. While possible, HEM may still be prohibitively challenging or risky at diameters below .062”, and your application and machine must be considered carefully.

Techniques to Prevent Tool Failure:

Excessive Heat & Thermal Shock

Due to the small nature of miniature tooling and the high running speeds they require, heat generation can quickly become an issue. When heat is not controlled, the workpiece and tooling may experience thermal cracking, melting, burning, built up edge, or warping.

To combat high heat, coolant is often used to decrease the surface temperature of the material as well as aid in chip evacuation and lubricity. However, care must be taken to ensure that using coolant doesn’t cool the material too quickly or unevenly. If an improper coolant method is used, thermal shock can occur. Thermal shock happens when a material expands unevenly, creating micro fractures that propagate throughout the material and can crack, warp, or change the physical properties of the material.

Techniques to Prevent Heat & Thermal Shock:

Key Takeaways

If performed properly, miniature tooling (<.125”) can reap the same benefits of HEM that larger diameter tooling can: reduced tool wear, accelerated part production rates, and greater machining accuracy. However, more care must be taken to monitor the machining process and to prevent tool fragility, excessive heat, and thermal shock.

Check out this example of HEM toolpaths (trochoidal milling) being run with a 3/16″ Harvey Tool End Mill in aluminum.

 

Introduction to High Efficiency Milling

The following is just one of several blog posts relevant to High Efficiency Milling. To achieve a full understanding of this popular machining method, view any of the additional HEM posts below!

High Speed Machining vs. HEM I How to Combat Chip Thinning I Diving into Depth of Cut I How to Avoid 4 Major Types of Tool Wear I Intro to Trochoidal Milling


High Efficiency Milling (HEM) is a strategy that is rapidly gaining popularity in the metalworking industry. Most CAM packages now offer modules to generate HEM toolpaths, each with their own proprietary name. In these packages, HEM can also be known as Dynamic Milling or High Efficiency Machining, among others. HEM can result in profound shop efficiency, extended tool life, greater performance, and cost savings. High performance end mills designed to achieve higher speeds and feeds will help machinists to reap the full benefits of this popular machining method.

High Efficiency Milling Defined

HEM is a milling technique for roughing that utilizes a lower Radial Depth of Cut (RDOC) and a higher Axial Depth of Cut (ADOC). This spreads wear evenly across the cutting edge, dissipates heat, and reduces the chance of tool failure.

This strategy differs from traditional or conventional milling, which typically calls for a higher RDOC and lower ADOC. Traditional milling causes heat concentrations in one small portion of the cutting tool, expediting the tool wear process. Further, while Traditional Milling call for more axial passes, HEM toolpaths use more passes radially.

For more information on optimizing Depth of Cut in relation to HEM, see Diving into Depth of Cut: Peripheral, Slotting & HEM Approaches.

High Efficiency Milling

Built-In CAM Applications

Machining technology has been advancing with the development of faster, more powerful machines. In order to keep up, many CAM applications have developed built-in features for HEM toolpaths, including Trochoidal Milling, a method of machining used to create a slot wider than the cutting tool’s cutting diameter.

HEM is largely based on the theory surrounding Radial Chip Thinning, or the phenomenon that occurs with varying RDOC, and relates to the chip thickness and feed per tooth. HEM adjusts parameters to maintain a constant load on the tool through the entire roughing operation, resulting in more aggressive material removal rates (MRR). In this way, HEM differs from other high performance toolpaths, which involve different methods for achieving significant MRR.

Virtually any CNC machine can perform HEM – the key is a fast CNC controller. When converting from a regular program to HEM, about 20 lines of HEM code will be written for every line of regular code. A fast processor is needed to look ahead for the code, and keep up with the operation. In addition, advanced CAM software that intelligently manages tool load by adjusting the IPT and RDOC is also needed.

HEM Case Studies

The following example shows the result a machinist had when using a Helical Solutions HEV-5 tool to perform an HEM operation in 17-4PH stainless steel. While performing HEM, this ½” diameter, 5-flute end mill engaged the part just 12% radially, but 100% axially. This machinist was able to reduce tool wear and was able to complete 40 parts with a single tool, versus only 15 with a traditional roughing toolpath.

The effect of HEM on a roughing application can also be seen in the case study below. While machining 6061 aluminum with Helical’s H45AL-C-3, a 1/2″, 3-flute rougher, this machinist was able to finish a part in 3 minutes, versus 11 minutes with a traditional roughing toolpath. One tool was able to make 900 parts with HEM, a boost of more than 150% over the traditional method.

Importance of Tooling to HEM

Generally speaking, HEM is a matter of running the tool – not the tool itself. Virtually every tool can perform HEM, but using tooling built to withstand the rigors of HEM will result in greater success. While you can run a marathon in any type of shoes, you’d likely get the best results and performance from running shoes.

HEM is often regarded as a machining method for larger diameter tooling because of the aggressive MRR of the operation and the fragility of tooling under 1/8” in size. However, miniature tooling can be used to achieve HEM, too.

Using miniature tooling for HEM can create additional challenges that must be understood prior to beginning your operation.

Best Tools for HEM:

  • High flute count for increased MRR.
  • Large core diameter for added strength.
  • Tool coating optimized for the workpiece material for increased lubricity.
  • Variable Pitch/Variable Helix design for reduced harmonics.

Key Takeaways

HEM is a machining operation which continues to grow in popularity in shops worldwide. A milling technique for roughing that utilizes a lower RDOC and higher ADOC than traditional milling, HEM distributes wear evenly across the cutting edge of a tool, reducing heat concentrations and slowing the rate of tool wear. This is especially true in tooling best suited to promote the benefits of HEM.

High Speed Machining Vs. HEM

The following is just one of several blog posts relevant to High Efficiency Milling. To achieve a full understanding of this popular machining method, view any of the additional HEM posts below!

Introduction to High Efficiency Milling I How to Combat Chip Thinning I Diving into Depth of Cut I How to Avoid 4 Major Types of Tool Wear I Intro to Trochoidal Milling


Advancements in the metalworking industry have led to new, innovative ways of increasing productivity. One of the most popular ways of doing so (creating many new buzzwords in the process) has been the discovery of new, high-productivity toolpaths. Terms like trochoidal milling, high speed machining, adaptive milling, feed milling, and High Efficiency Milling are a handful of the names given to these cutting-edge techniques.

With multiple techniques being described with somewhat similar terms, there is some confusion as to what each is referring to. High Efficiency Milling (HEM) and High Speed Machining (HSM) are two commonly used terms and techniques that can often be confused with one another. Both describe techniques that lead to increased material removal rates and boosted productivity.  However, the similarities largely stop there.

High Speed Machining

High speed machining is often used as an umbrella term for all high productivity machining methods including HEM. However, HEM and HSM are unique, separate machining styles. HSM encompasses a technique that results in higher production rates while using a much different approach to depth of cut and speeds and feeds. While certain HEM parameters are constantly changing, HSM uses constant values for the key parameters. A very high spindle speed paired with much lighter axial depths of cut results in a much higher allowable feed rate. This is also often referred to as feed milling. Depths of cut involve a very low axial and high radial components. The method in general is often thought of as z-axis slice machining, where the tool will step down a fixed amount, machine all it can, then step down the next fixed amount and continue the cycle.

High speed machining techniques can also be applied to contoured surfaces using a ball profile or corner radius tool. In these situations, the tool is not used in one plane at a time, and will follow the 3 dimensional curved surfaces of a part. This is extremely effective for using one tool to bring a block of material down to a final (or close to final) shape using high resultant material removal rates paired with the ability to create virtually any shape.

High Efficiency Milling

HEM has evolved from a philosophy that takes advantage of the maximum amount of work that a tool can perform. Considerations for chip thinning and feed rate adjustment are used so that each cutting edge of a tool takes a consistent chip thickness with each rotation, even at varying radial depths of cut and while interpolating around curves. This allows machinists the opportunity to utilize a radial depth of cut that more effectively uses the full potential of a given tool. Utilizing the entire available length of cut allows tool wear to be spread over a greater area, prolonging tool life and lowering production costs. Effectively, HEM uses the depths associated with a traditional finishing operation but boosts speeds and feeds, resulting in much higher material removal rates (MRR). This technique is typically used for hogging out large volumes of material in roughing and pocketing applications.

In short, HEM is somewhat similar to an accelerated finishing operation in regards to depth of cut, while HSM is more of a high feed contouring operation. Both can achieve increased MRR and higher productivity when compared to traditional methods. While HSM can be seen as an umbrella term for all high efficiency paths, HEM has grown in popularity to a point where it can be classified on its own. Classifying each separately takes a bit of clarification, showing they each have power in certain situations.

Check out the video below to see HEM in action!

 

Most Common Methods of Tool Entry

Tool entry is pivotal to machining success, as it’s one of the most punishing operations for a cutter. Entering a part in a way that’s not ideal for the tool or operation could lead to a damaged part or exhausted shop resources. Below, we’ll explore the most common part entry methods, as well as tips for how to perform them successfully.


Pre-Drilled Hole

Pre-drilling a hole to full pocket depth (and 5-10% larger than the end mill diameter) is the safest practice of dropping your end mill into a pocket. This method ensures the least amount of end work abuse and premature tool wear.

tool entry predrill

 


Helical Interpolation

Helical Interpolation is a very common and safe practice of tool entry with ferrous materials. Employing corner radius end mills during this operation will decrease tool wear and lessen corner breakdown. With this method, use a programmed helix diameter of greater than 110-120% of the cutter diameter.

helical interpolation

 


Ramping-In

This type of operation can be very successful, but institutes many different torsional forces the cutter must withstand. A strong core is key for this method, as is room for proper chip evacuation. Using tools with a corner radius, which strengthen its cutting portion, will help.

ramping

Suggested Starting Ramp Angles:

Hard/Ferrous Materials: 1°-3°

Soft/Non-Ferrous Materials: 3°-10°

For more information on this popular tool entry method, see Ramping to Success.


Arcing

This method of tool entry is similar to ramping in both method and benefit. However, while ramping enters the part from the top, arcing does so from the side. The end mill follows a curved tool path, or arc, when milling, this gradually increasing the load on the tool as it enters the part. Additionally, the load put on the tool decreases as it exits the part, helping to avoid shock loading and tool breakage.


Straight Plunge

This is a common, yet often problematic method of entering a part. A straight plunge into a part can easily lead to tool breakage. If opting for this machining method, however, certain criteria must be met for best chances of machining success. The tool must be center cutting, as end milling incorporates a flat entry point making chip evacuation extremely difficult. Drill bits are intended for straight plunging, however, and should be used for this type of operation.

tool entry

 


Straight Tool Entry

Straight entry into the part takes a toll on the cutter, as does a straight plunge. Until the cutter is fully engaged, the feed rate upon entry is recommended to be reduced by at least 50% during this operation.

tool entry

 


Roll-In Tool Entry

Rolling into the cut ensures a cutter to work its way to full engagement and naturally acquire proper chip thickness. The feed rate in this scenario should be reduced by 50%.

tool entry

 

6 Uses of Double Angle Shank Cutters

A Double Angle Shank Cutter is often referred to as the “Swiss Army Knife of Machining” due to its extreme versatility. This singular tool can be used for chamfering, back chamfering, V-groove milling, deburring, and countersinking. Below, we’ll learn the nuances of each operation, and why a Double Angle Shank Cutter might is an excellent tool to have on hand in any machine shop.


1. Thread Milling

Both in purpose and look, a Double Angle Shank Cutter is very similar to that of a single-form thread mill. Single-form thread mills are more versatile than multi-form thread mills, as they are not locked into a fixed pitch. Double Angle Shank Cutters that have a 60° angle can create internal and external 60° Unified National (UN) and metric threads. Double Angle Shank Cutters with a 55° angle can be used to thread 55° British Standard Pipe Threads (BSPT). To determine the thread sizes that various Double Angle Shank Cutters can produce, it’s helpful to consult thread fit charts, which pair appropriate cutter diameters to the thread size needed.


2. Chamfering

Depending on the requirements of your chamfering operation, and the angle of the chamfer you’re creating on your part, a Double Angle Shank Cutter might be appropriate. The angle of the top or bottom of the cutting face of the tool (called out below in as a B1 dimension), will determine the angle of your part’s chamfer. The area marked in red in Figures 2 and 3 below indicate the cutting portion for your chamfering and back chamfering (leaving a chamfer on the bottom of a part) operation.

For more information on the angles of Double Angle Shank Cutters, view Harvey Tool’s helpful guide: “Angles Untangled.”


3. Back Chamfering

Consider a through-hole that has a burr or tear-out caused from drilling the back of a workpiece. Reorienting the workpiece and relocating the hole is time-consuming, and it may be difficult to accurately finish the hole. In a case like this, back chamfering the burred hole without changing the setup is a preferred method. Put simply, the ability to accurately chamfer not only the top – but also the bottom of a part without needing to refasten the workpiece in your machine will save valuable time and money.

For best results when chamfering with Double Angle Shank Cutters, use a stepping over technique with diminishing passes as the radial engagement increases. This strategy helps to manage the amount of contact along the angle and can significantly avoid tool deflection.


4. Machining V-Grooves

A Double Angle Shank Cutter is commonly applied for machining V-groove profiles because of its cutting head, which is perpendicular to the tool centerline. This provides effective cutting action, even at a low spindle speed. A low tip speed can lead to issues with other tools, such as Chamfer Cutters, where the pointed profile is on-center of the tool.


5. Deburring

The task of hand-deburring parts can be tiresome for you, and cost inefficient for your shop. It can also lead to inaccuracies in parts that require precise dimensions. Double Angle Shank Cutters can be used to debur a part right in your CNC machine. By doing so, the process of finishing a part is made simple, fast, and accurate. Of course, ensuring proper clearance prior to machining the bottom of a machined hole is pivotal.

Other useful and versatile tools to have on-hand for quick CNC deburring include deburring end mills, back deburring mills, undercutting end mills, and chamfer cutters.


6. Countersinking

Countersinking a part  is done so a screw, nail, or bolt is able to sit flush with the part surface. Using specialty profile tooling can help enlarge the rim of a drilled hole and bevel the sides for a screw to sit accurately. A Double Angle Shank Cutter can also perform this operation by using the bottom portion of its cutting face.


Because of its ability to perform six different operations, Double Angle Shank Cutters are an ideal tool to keep in your tool carousel. In a bind, these tool forms can mill threads, chamfer, back chamfer, machine v-grooves, deburr in your CNC machine, and countersink. This versatility makes it a machining favorite and can offer shops boosted productivity by eliminating the need to flip parts, deburr by hand, or carry multiple tool forms.

For more on Harvey Tool Double Angle Shank Cutters, Click Here.

3 Ways to Help Solve the Machinist Shortage

The manufacturing industry is on the rise, but there is a shortage in the workforce that is limiting the abilities of machine shops to find great talent and fulfill their needs. As manufacturing continues to move back to the US, the shortage will only grow larger. With nearly 70% of the machinist workforce over the age of 45, there has to be an injection of youth in the industry over the next 20 years to keep American manufacturing alive and well. Currently employed machinists are the best source to encourage today’s youth to join the profession, so the community will be an integral part of solving this machinist shortage.

1. Reach Out and Get Involved

The best thing machinists can do to make an immediate impact is to begin reaching out to their local communities, sharing their craft with families and students in the area. If we want to solve the machinist shortage, we have to get students excited about the industry. One great way to get students interested is to hold an open house at your machine shop and open your doors to local schools for visits. Since machining is a very visual craft, students will appreciate seeing finished projects in-person and watching the machines at work. Shops could also open their doors to vocational schools and have a “Career Night,” where students who are interested in the trades can come with their families and learn more about what it is like to be a machinist. It is important to get the families of interested youth involved, as colleges will do the same at their open houses, and it gives the family a better sense of where they may be sending their son or daughter after graduation.

machinist shortage

As great as it is to get students and families inside the machine shop, it is equally important for machinists to branch out and attend career days at local schools, as the trades are often underrepresented at these events. Bringing in a few recent projects and videos or photos of more advanced machining processes will be sure to open a few eyes, and might inspire a student who had never considered machining to do some research on the profession.

2. Join Communities on Social Media

According to a report from the Pew Internet Research Center, 92% of high school students use social media daily – a staggering number that must be taken into consideration when it comes to inspiring the younger generations. One easy way machinists can share their work is by using social media apps like Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube. Instagram in particular has a great community of machinists, who are constantly sharing videos, tips and tricks, photos of their finished work, and talking to each other about best practices. Many machinist-related Instagram accounts have thousands of followers, and every machine shop should be jumping on this trend not only for their own marketing efforts, but also to get in front of the younger audience present in that space.

machinist shortage

Machinists love sharing their work with the community on social media, like this example from Reboot Engineering (@rebooteng) on Instagram.

If Instagram is not an option, there are several Facebook groups with tens of thousands of machinists talking about the trade, and quite a few influential machinists on YouTube who have substantial followings and are working to raise awareness about their trade. The machinist community on Twitter is smaller than the others, but it is growing and could be a valuable resource going forward.

3. Share Your Knowledge

New machinists will be more likely to embrace the profession and stick around if they are welcomed with open arms and in-depth, hands-on training from the senior machinists in a shop. This will decrease turnover, and keep younger machinists connected to the trade from the start. A machine shop full of veteran machinists can be an intimidating environment for a new hire, so this is a vital step in solving the machinist shortage.

It is also a great idea to share knowledge and stories with younger relatives. Nieces and nephews, younger cousins, grandchildren, and sons and daughters may find inspiration to follow in the footsteps of someone they look up to, but they’ll never know unless those experiences are shared with them.

If you already know someone who is considering a career as a machinist, share our “How to Become a Machinist” blog post with them, which is a great resource for all machine shops looking to hire young talent. This article could be handed out at open houses, career days, or school visits, and is part of Harvey Performance Company’s ongoing effort to improve the manufacturing industry and help solve the machinist shortage.

You can also share our new infographic, which outlines the current state of the industry, and provides a visual representation of how you can help solve this shortage as a current machinist. Use the hashtag #PlungeIntoMachining and share to your Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and LinkedIn pages to help us start a movement!

Solving the Machinist Shortage

How to Become a Machinist

Machining is one of the fastest growing occupations in the US, with thousands of open positions listed all across various job boards and websites. Because graduating students are more likely to head to college than join the trades, there is currently a major shortage in the workforce for machinists. As the “Baby Boomer” generation inches closer to retirement, this shortage will only continue to grow. According to American Machinist, nearly 70% of the current machinist workforce is over the age of 45, which means there is a great need for younger workers over the next two decades. The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) is predicting a 10% increase in the machinist workforce with opportunities for 29,000 additional skilled machinists by 2024, so it is certainly an exciting time to start thinking about the available career opportunities in the machining industry.

Getting Started

One of the best things about becoming a machinist is that there is a fairly low barrier to entry level positions. Many machinists start working right out of high school, with 12-18 months of on-the-job training or a 1-2 year apprenticeship. This path generally does not require any experience past a high school education, but prospective machinists are encouraged to take math classes including geometry and trigonometry, and participate in metalworking, drafting, and blueprint reading classes if possible. Chris Metayer, a CNC Operator with Helical Solutions, took this same route to begin his career. “I didn’t know anything about machining when I started, but I trained side by side with other employees. I am a hands-on learner, so it was a perfect learning experience for me.” said Metayer. In the end, most of an entry-level machinists’ learning will be done hands-on in the machine shop while getting paid to learn the craft.

machinist

Others may take a two-year machining-based program at a community college or technical school, where they can learn more advanced skills like Computer Numerical Control (CNC) Machining and Computer Aided Design (CAD) or Computer Aided Manufacturing (CAM) programming.  They would then enter the workforce following the completion of an associate’s degree. These machinists tend to earn higher salaries and are more apt to advance to a management role, but they will also need to pay for the costs of their continued education and will still require some hands-on training before they can jump into their new positions. However, there are added benefits to continuing your education. Jake Barnes, another member of the CNC team at Helical, earned his associates degree in Integrated Manufacturing Technology at Southern Maine Community College, and has worked in various departments since joining Helical. Jake started as a manual grinder, then moved to inspection before landing with the CNC team. “I personally recommend going to a trade school” said Barnes, “You will get exposure to many different classes, which opens up new career opportunities across the industry.”

Some machinists who want to work in more advanced industries like aerospace or tech may attend a four-year college and take advanced courses in calculus, physics, and engineering. All of these options are widely accepted in the machining community, so it is more a matter of personal preference and an individual’s specific situation that determine which path to take.

Location Matters

While there are open jobs for machinists all over the country, there are certainly a few areas that would be considered machinist “hot spots.” These areas of the country have increased job openings in the industry and often pay better wages, since machining skills are in higher demand. The Great Lakes Region (Michigan, Ohio, Illinois, Indiana, Upstate New York, Pennsylvania), and the Southeast (The Carolinas, Louisiana, Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi) are great places to look for work, with over 150,000 currently employed machinists. Most of the work in the Great Lakes Region is dominated by the automotive industry, especially in Michigan. In the Southeast US, there has been a recent influx of manufacturing jobs after plants owned by Apple, Boeing, General Electric, Haier, and LeNovo all opened in the area. In fact, Mississippi offers the highest annual salaries for machinists of any state in the country.

Texas, California, and Washington (especially Seattle) are also hot spots for machining jobs. The west coast holds some of the world’s largest aerospace manufacturing plants, so these areas have plenty of job opportunities for machining and manufacturing.

Salary Expectations

A career as a machinist can be rewarding and fun, especially when it comes to working with different materials and creating amazing and intricate parts. But in the end, compensation matters as well. What is often misunderstood most about this industry is that the salary range for machinists is above the national median.

The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) reported in 2016 that those in the workforce with a high school diploma earned an annual median salary of $36,000, while those with an associate’s degree earned $42,000 across all occupations. The BLS also reported the median salaries for machinists in 2016, with median earnings at $43,200, across all levels of education.

The top 10% of machinists earn over $62,500, and depending on what projects they work on, those wages can go even higher. For example, someone working in the aerospace industry or tech industry can expect to make a higher salary as a machinist, but will likely need to have a more extensive education, which can get costly. Experience also matters, as salaries are likely to increase as machinists get more years under their belts. However, many entry level machinist jobs require little to no educational cost and no experience, so the return on investment can be very high once hired into the industry.

Machinist Career Paths

There are quite a few career paths that a machinist can take once they begin working on their craft. Some machinists will work their way up the shop ladder, going from an entry level CNC operator, to a full-on CNC machinist, and possibly finding themselves in a shop management position at some point in their careers. Others may transition away from machining and begin to work with CAD/CAM or CNC Programming applications, working with the machinists on the floor to program and troubleshoot the machines and design new parts to be created. Many machinists also move into careers in inspection, quality control, or production planning, which can be an excellent way to move up the corporate ladder.

machinist

Working in Inspection is a possible career path for a machinist.

Those who do earn an associate’s degree in a machining-based program should consider a path in engineering. The experiences learned as a machinist translate well to this field, and having an associate’s degree allows for the flexibility of going back to school to finish up a Bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering. For those who may be unable to go to school full-time, there are many online and part-time courses available. These courses make it possible to work full-time or part-time to advance your skills and attain hands-on experience while earning a degree. Both Barnes and Matayer talked about heading back to school to complete an engineering program at some point, taking advantage of the Harvey Performance Company tuition reimbursement program to advance their education and careers.

The skills learned as a machinist also lay a foundation for becoming an entrepreneur or starting a business. Some machinists will open their own machine shops, manufacturing outsourced parts from other companies, while others will take their skills and create a unique product to fulfill a need they identify in the market.

Do Your Research

As the manufacturing industry continues to grow in America, the shortage of machinists in the workforce will become an incredible source of opportunity for our youth. Breaking into the industry now can set young machinists up for great career opportunities. The skills learned as a machinist also translate well to many different jobs, especially in manufacturing and engineering.

machinist

However, not every machine shop should be treated equal. Potential machinists will want to research shops in their area to find the right fit. As Matayer puts it, “Finding the right shop matters. You want to find a place with newer equipment, great benefits, and clean air in a safe environment.” Poor air quality or unsafe working conditions can directly affect a machinist’s long-term health, so doing the proper research before accepting a position can prevent any serious issues.

If you are curious and want to learn more, reach out to your local trade school or college, talk to a machinist, check out some online forums, and read about the profession. You should also check out the machinist community on Instagram, which is full of amazing customer projects, helpful tips and tricks, and videos that will give you a better idea of what is possible in this field! Machinists are always more than happy to share their experiences, but the biggest thing you can do is try. Get out there, start creating, and see where it takes you – the possibilities are endless!